YOU DIDN'T EXPECT ALL THESE SOURCES OF DANGER, DID YOU?

Dogs love their walks outdoors and romping around in the garden. Parasites are hard to avoid and some of them can lead to potentially fatal health issues for your companion.

LUNGWORM LARVAE

are transmitted by slugs and snails and are also contained in their slime trails. So, lungworm larvae may be found on any object recently soiled with slime: outdoor water bowls, puddles, chewing bones and toys. Lungworm infection can be fatal.

TICKS

can transmit infectious diseases, some of which can be fatal for dogs, e.g. babesiosis. Ticks are found on vegetation. They are abundant in spring and autumn but are active all year round.

HEARTWORM LARVAE

are transmitted by mosquitoes. Heartworms can be fatal to dogs but fortunately they are not generally found in the UK or Ireland. However, they may be a risk for any dog that travels abroad.

A FATAL RISK

YOU CAN HELP TO PREVENT PARASITES WITH MONTHLY INSIDE & OUT PROTECTION

Lungworm infection is spreading throughout the UK

  • with cases now reported in areas where previously there were none

How does my dog get lungworms?

Lungworms are small worms that live in the blood vessels of the heart and lungs.

  • Their larvae, hosted by slugs and snails, are also contained in their slime trails. So, lungworm larvae can be found on any object recently soiled with slime (outdoor water bowls, puddles, chewing bones and toys).  
  • Young dogs (under 18 months) are most at risk of infection.

How will lungworms affect my dog?

  • Lungworm infection causes respiratory signs such as coughing and tiredness at exercise.  
  • Infection may also cause blood clotting problems, leading to a wide range of signs associated with bleeding.
  • Most worryingly, lungworm infection can even cause death.

Tick-borne diseases are a rising problem

  • Ticks are the second most common external parasites to affect your dog.
  • Because of climate change, ticks remain active for longer periods, their numbers are increasing, tick species are spreading and tick-borne diseases are appearing where previously they were not present.1,2

 

  1. Scharlemann JPW et al., (2008), Trends in ixodid tick abundance and distribution in Great Britain. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 22, 238-247.
  2. Dautel H et al., (2008), Winter activity of Ixodes ricinus in a Berlin forest area. I.J. Med. Microbiol.,298, 50-54.

 

How does my dog get ticks?

  • Ticks are found in dense vegetation and cling on pets as they brush by. It is very difficult to prevent a dog’s exposure to ticks.
  • There are a number of different ticks which can affect your pet. Some are more common in certain parts of Europe, so if you travel with your dog, please consult your vet about risks in the places you are visiting

How will ticks affect my dog?

Ticks are a particular concern because they transmit infectious diseases, some of which can be fatal:

  • Babesiosis
    caused by Babesia species. These organisms are blood parasites, causing anaemia due to destruction of the red blood cells. Although not common in the UK, in 2016 cases of babesiosis were identified in Essex.1,2
    Rather worryingly babesiosis can cause death of affected dogs.
  • Ehrlichiosis
    is caused by bacteria that infect the white blood cells. Initially it causes a fever and some dogs may recover completely. Other dogs remain infected and can develop problems with their immune and blood clotting system. Rare in the UK but common in Southern Europe and so of particular concern if your pet travels abroad with you.
  • Lyme disease
    is the most common tick-borne disease in the UK. It is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi. In dogs, signs may include lethargy, loss of appetite, fever, arthritis and swollen lymph nodes.

 

  1. Swainsbury et al.Veterinary Record, 2016, 178:172
  2. Phipps et al. Veterinary Record, 2016, 178: 243-244.

 

Heartworms are found where there are mosquitoes

  • Heartworms are an emerging risk for dogs throughout Southern and Eastern European countries.1
  • Climate change is favourable to these parasites as heartworm larvae are transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Heartworm is generally not considered an issue here in the UK, but may be a risk for dogs that travel abroad.

 

  1. Morchon R et al., Heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) and their vectors in Europe – new distribution trends. Frontiers in Physiology, June 2012.

How does my dog get heartworms?

  • Heartworm larvae deposited by a feeding mosquito migrate within 5-6 months to the heart chambers or into the vessels of the lungs.
  • Once matured in the heart, those worms can measure up to 30 cm in length and seriously affect the blood flow. The right side of the heart has to work much harder to push blood towards the lung arteries, which progressively causes heart failure.

How will heartworms affect my dog?

  • Clinical signs of heart or lung condition are commonly present. These signs develop and progress slowly over weeks or months.
  • Initially, your dog will tire easily, show shortness of breath or coughing after exercise. In the later stages, coughing and fatigue will be observed even at rest.
  • If left untreated, heartworm disease is eventually fatal.

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DOG - LEARN ABOUT - TEASER

FIND OUT THE RISKS TO YOUR DOG

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A FAMILY AFFAIR CAUSED BY PARASITES

Help reduce the risk with inside and out protection for your dog

MONTHLY INSIDE & OUT TREATMENT

can help to target deadly parasites in dogs and to reduce the risk of parasite infections in people too